Anti-social media

I decided, while on holiday in NZ over Xmas, that Twitter and Facebook take up too much of my time and brain power, so, earlier this week I culled 700 people, down to 17, from Twitter and I stopped following a whole lot of groups and people in Facebook.

No offence if I've dropped you. It's not you - honest! - it's me, I need my brain back.

I've tried going cold turkey before - mostly by removing the apps from my phone and iPad - but it didn't work, so what I did this time was, for every tweet of FB update, I asked, "Could I live without this?", and if I decided I did I unfollowed it. I kept doing this until I got to the "higher value" stuff and then I took a deep breath and asked myself "Could I really live without this? Is my life really better with this?" and I culled a lot more. I repeated this, over several days, until there were only a few updates ever 3 or 4 hours and it just wasn't worth opening the apps up. Then I did some more culling and I deleted the apps.  

image.jpg

Interesting thing: Twitter didn't mind but Facebook fought back. It was previously only showing me a small percentage of posts from some groups (like the urban photography group) and so long as I followed those groups it kept giving me new stuff every time I looked. So I culled them.\

I will continue to write and share stuff on Twitter and Facebook but I want to use my brain, mostly, to write blogs and books and articles, and to read books, rather social media.

That said, I'm still following God on Twitter - The real one - and 16 others.

Please don't be offended if I'm not following you. It's me, not you!

Comment

clarke ching

Clarke Ching is an expert in the application of Goldratt's Theory of Constraints to Agile software development. He is author of Rocks into Gold and Rolling Rocks Downhill (BETA). He gained Scrum certification from Ken Schwaber in Scotland in 2004 and now works as the Lean and Agile internal expert at The Royal London Group. Clarke focuses on Cash-Flow-Driven-Development and the use of positive psychology to help project teams flourish.